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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
everyone is talking about this week, david petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of th
of this presidential campaign and some historical perspective on this year's race. give we are glad you joined us. a conversation with oliver stone and peter kuznick coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: part two of our conversation with oliver stone and peter kusnick. their 10-part series on showtime kicks off next monday night. now is another preview of "the. history of the united states. " -- "the untold story of the united states. " >> i steadied american history. it made sense. we were the center of the world. there was manifest destiny and we were the good guys. i have traveled the world now. i continue my education as an infantryman in vietnam. made a lot of movies, some of them about history. and i have learned a lot more about what i once knew. and when i heard from my children what they're learning in school, i was perturbed that they were not getting the more honest view of the world and i did. we lived most of our lives in a fog. but i will let my children to have access to something that looks beyond what i recall as the tyranny of now. >> material now. tavis: the you think a 10-part series on showtime, a companion book
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfa
could find, which would have made life a lot easier for all of us. right. but what i saw initially, stylization. not only the colors that were used, but the way the colors are applied to this piece. let's show it in the round. the design is very unusual, and to my eye peculiar to shearwater pottery from ocean springs, mississippi, which started in 1928, and which was destroyed when katrina went through there a few years back. they're rebuilding it, but it's a very famous pottery, primarily run by walter and mac anderson, who did most of the decorating through the '30s and '40s and '50s. walter is recognized as an artistic genius. couldn't really socialize. he was left to himself to decorate and design. but this is what he did. the colors, the patterns. what also i notice, where the clay shows through, and then the clay color inside, looks to me like shearwater pottery. so i'm pretty sure that's what it is. and it's what we have to do when we don't have a mark. i did research. there's not an exact picture of this in any of the books that i found. and so we have to make certain educa
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)